Famous Quotes of Poet Aeschylus

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Relentless persuasion overbears him, irresistible child of forecounseling destruction. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 385.)

For the poison of hatred seated near the heart doubles the burden for the one who suffers the disease; he is burdened with his own sorrow, and groans on seeing another's happiness. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 834.)

For there is no defense for a man who, in the excess of his wealth, has kicked the great altar of Justice out of sight. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 381.)

For he does not wish to seem but to be just. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 592.)

Against a spike Kick not, for fear it pain thee if thou strike. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek dramatist. Aigisthos, in Agamemnon, l. 1623-4, trans. by Gilbert Murray. Some translations give the more colloquial, "Do not kick against the pricks." The words sum up one of the play's major themes, of helplessness and submission in the face of life's savage struggle.)

Alas for the affairs of men! When they are fortunate you might compare them to a shadow; and if they are unfortunate, a wet sponge with one dash wipes the picture away. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1327.)

The evils of mortals are manifold; nowhere is trouble of the same wing seen. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Suppliants, l. 327.)

When a tongue fails to send forth appropriate shafts, there might be a word to act as healer of these. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Suppliants, l. 446.)

Ares, gold-changer of bodies. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 438.)

Bonds and the pangs of hunger are excellent prophet doctors for the wits. (Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1621.)

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