Famous Quotes of Poet Alexander Pope

Here you will find a huge collection of inspiring and beautiful quotes of Alexander Pope.Our large collection of famous Alexander Pope Quotations and Sayings are inspirational and carefully selected. We hope you will enjoy the Quatations of Alexander Pope on poetandpoem.com. We also have an impressive collection of poems from famous poets in our poetry section

Now lapdogs give themselves the rousing shake, And sleepless lovers, just at twelve, awake: (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.)

Did some more sober critic come abroad? If wrong, I smil'd; if right, I kiss'd the rod. (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot.)

Blest paper-credit! last and best supply! That lends corruption lighter wings to fly! (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Bathurst.)

Here files of pins extend their shining rows, Puffs, powders, patches, bibles, billet-doux. (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.)

Smooth flow the waves, the zephyrs gently play, Belinda smiled, and all the world was gay. (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.)

Chaste to her husband, frank to all beside, A teeming mistress, but a barren bride. (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to a Lady, l. 71-2 (1735).)

Fair tresses man's imperial race ensnare, And beauty draws us with a single hair. (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Rape of the Lock, cto. 2, l. 27-8 (1714).)

Tis education forms the common mind, Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined. (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Cobham, l. 149-50 (1734).)

Be silent always when you doubt your sense; And speak, though sure, with seeming diffidence: (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.)

What dire offence from am'rous causes springs, What mighty contests rise from trivial things, I sing— (Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.)

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